© Gaye Wilson 2009

Image by ilcoWhat could you do with one extra hour?

  • Sleep in?
  • Watch television?
  • Play a computer game?

Or could you

  • Read a book?
  • Walk the dog?
  • Write a letter?

How about:

  • Work on your business plan.
  • Write out your goals.
  • Have quality time with your family.

There are many activities you can do in an hour. An extra hour per day would allow you to do many extra activities, so it would be a good thing, right?

But where do extra hours come from?

Take a look at the first list above. These are activities that you could curtail to find an extra hour. These are passive activities. They are about being, rather than doing. They don’t necessarily have a purpose. They just are. They are often default actions when we are too lazy to do something constructive.

The second list contains active activities. Like the first list, they are ego-centric – centred around you. Unlike the first list, they have a purpose. You walk the dog so that both of you benefit from exercise. You read a book to relax or learn something. You write a letter to communicate with someone. These activities are about the present. They are good to fit into your day.

The third list is also an active list, but this one contains activities that are all about the future.

When was the last time you sat down and planned your future?

If you’re like most people, you haven’t. Most people drift through life and wonder why it isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Those who revel in life and accomplish what they want in life are those who plan their future.

Victories are planned.

So, this week, to gain your victory, find an extra hour to do some planning.

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Comments

6 Responses to “One extra hour”

  1. Tammy on September 21st, 2009 9:00 am

    Great post. I need more than an hour to just chill. Most of my time is well spent on the computer.

  2. Dave Meyer on September 21st, 2009 10:28 am

    It is amazing the amount of time we waste each day. Multiply that by 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year and you see a lot of time that could be put to better use.

    I think that one problem is that we confuse “down time” with “wasted time”. Down time is important to recharge our mental batteries. Wasted time is just gone forever.

  3. Kathy M. on September 24th, 2009 6:44 am

    Not sure I would agree that “being” necessarily equates to “not having a purpose” or laziness.

    Maybe it’s because I lean towards introversion, but there are times when I need to decompress and give my brain and senses a break. Otherwise, I start to feel overstimulated and stressed out.

    After some chill time, THEN I’m able to plan, do and deal w/life.

    Down time can be quality time for some of us!

  4. Gaye Wilson on September 24th, 2009 8:33 am

    Hi Kathy,

    Welcome to the blog!

    I agree, sometimes your victory will be closer if you chill for a bit. Everyone needs time to chill.

    Not everyone realises that they need time to chill. Not everyone realises that doing nothing or doing something mindless or just being is an important part of chilling. Just ask any parent who sees a child doing nothing. The immediate response is to get the child to do something constructive.

    Just being can be constructive.

    But that’s not what I’m talking about in this post. Just being or passive activities seem to be the default for a lot of people. These are the people who would usually pick a passive activity when presented with an extra or spare hour. Those are the people who probably don’t accomplish much (huge generalisation here!).

    And of course there are times in everyone’s lives when you go through cycles of non-constructive behaviour, simply because.

    The post was meant to stimulate thought about how you are spending your time, and to look at ways of finding time to do some planning.

    Thanks for commenting and creating a debate!

  5. Melody Campbell, Building Your Coaching Business on September 25th, 2009 2:10 pm

    We all have the same amount of time, when ever I hear, “I didn’t have time” instead I hear, “poor planning on my part did not make time”.

    And sometimes, we simply do not chose to make the time. We are better off to admit this to ourselves and then to others who are counting on us.

  6. Bruce on May 22nd, 2010 6:57 am

    We all have the same amount of time, when ever I hear, “I didn’t have time” instead I hear, “poor planning on my part did not make time”.

    And sometimes, we simply do not chose to make the time. We are better off to admit this to ourselves and then to others who are counting on us.

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